Stores Non-Hashed FTP/SFTP/SSH Passwords

One of the ways that security issues at a web host can lead to hosted websites getting hacked is if there is breach that reveals users login details and then the hacker uses those to log in to customer accounts. Not getting breached in the first place is the best way to prevent this type of thing from occurring, but other measures should be taken to limit the potential impact of a breach.

One of the measures that needs to be taken is to store passwords as securely as possible, which means storing them in hashed form. You can think of a password hashing as one-way encryption. That is, the data is encrypted, but it cannot be decrypted, so the underlying password is not retrievable in normal circumstances. With this type of password storage when someone tries to log in the password they input is hashed and then compared with the stored password hash to see if they are the same. With hashed passwords even if someone gets access to the stored passwords it would be difficult for them to do anything with them, since they would first have to crack the hashes.

One way to spot if a password is being stored in non-hashed form somewhere in a web host systems is if it can be displayed to you, since if they were only stored in hashed form they wouldn’t know what the underlying password is to be able to show it to you. While we were working on a website hosted with recently we spotted this page in their control panel: control panel FTP/SSH page

When you click on the “View hidden password” it will in fact show the password for FTP/SFTP/SSH, which wouldn’t be possible if the password was properly stored. Since we can’t see the underlying systems we don’t know if they are storing the password in plaintext somewhere, which would be the worst case, or if they are at least encrypting it.

Such bad security doesn’t match’s claims about their security. For example they claim that:

The Platform is continually monitored and managed by specialized security experts who understand the security requirements of both the server and application.

Another claim that sounds bad, but could be an indication that other web hosts have even worse security is that:

Our managed hosting service is widely considered to be more secure than the many alternatives.

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Does the Vulnerability Fixed in WordPress 4.2.1 Also Impact WordPress 3.7, 3.8, and 3.9?

Update (May 7, 2015): WordPress has now released versions 3.7.8, 3.8.8, and 3.9.6 that fix the vulnerability described below.


Last week a vulnerability in WordPress was disclosed and fixed in version 4.2.1. While WordPress only officials supports one version at a time, since the introduction of automatic updates in WordPress 3.7 they have been releasing security updates for all older releases that include the automatic updates feature. This time though only updates for 4.0 and 4.1 were released.

An update for 3.9 has a Codex entry, which indicates that the version, 3.9.6, was released to deal with this. But that version doesn’t appear to exist. Updates for 3.7 and 3.8 also had Codex entries, but those entries were deleted last Friday.

We were curious as to what was going on (as are others) since knowing the full implications of vulnerabilities that impact WordPress is important when we are cleaning up hacked WordPress websites. So we decided to do some testing to see if the vulnerabilities actually impacted versions 3.7-3.9 and they haven’t been fixed or if those versions are not vulnerable.

When using the sample exploit code provided for the vulnerability we found that vulnerability is not exploitable in versions 3.7-3.9 in the form given. The reason for this is that in WordPress 4.0-4.2 a character near the beginning of the malicious comment is encoded:

<a title=&#8217;x onmouseover=alert(unescape(/hello%20world/.source))

That allows the malicious code that begins “onmouseover” to be executed. In 3.7-3.9 that encoding doesn’t occur:

<a title='x onmouseover=alert(unescape(/hello%20world/.source))

So the “onmouseover” is treated as part of the title attribute instead of as code that should be executed, so no malicious code is run.

The underlying problem that leads to all of this, that WordPress didn’t properly check to make sure that comments longer then could be stored are properly handled also does exist in these versions, so it is possible somebody could figure out another way to exploit this in versions 3.7-3.9. If you are still running 3.7-3.9 we would recommend you upgrade to at least 4.0.4 as soon as possible. Though, it would be best that anyone still running a version below 4.2.1 to upgrade to that version.

Posted in Website Security, WordPress | Leave a comment

InMotion Hosting Prominently Promoting Installation of EOL’d Joomla Version

When it comes to keeping websites secure, keeping the software on them up to date is one of the basic measures that needs to be taken. We know that web hosts are aware of this because they will often tell people when their websites have been hacked that it was due to outdated software (since this usually isn’t based on any actually evidence, it often is wrong). Unfortunately we continue to find that web hosts don’t bother to make sure that they are not distributing outdated software to their customers.

Recently while doing some work on a web site hosted with InMotion Hosting, we noticed that in the website’s cPanel control panel that the option to install Joomla 2.5 was being prominently displayed:


That should not be happening since support for Joomla 2.5 ended back on December 31. Not only does that put websites at risk if a security issues is found in Joomla 2.5, but it can cause unnecessary trouble down the road because upgrading from Joomla 2.5 to 3.x is not always the one-click upgrade it is a promoted as.

On the installation page they do provide the option to install the currently supported version of Joomla, 3.4.1, as well. But you would have to select that version from a drop down box:


The problems don’t stop there. On the main page for their software installing service the ninth slot is Moodle 2.0:


Support for Moodle 2.0 ended nearly three years ago, in June 2012.

As with Joomla, they do also offer supported versions, but you would have to select those from a dropdown where 2.0 is the default:


Installing this version now will lead to otherwise unnecessary work down the road because Moodle will have to be upgraded to version 2.2 before it can be upgraded to a version 2.3 of higher.

Posted in Bad Security, Joomla, Moodle, Outdated Web Software | Leave a comment

Most Website Hackers Are Not Sophisticated

One thing that we see fairly frequently with Internet security companies is that they try to sell their largely unneeded, and usually largely ineffective, security products and services by portraying websites as under constant threat from sophisticated hackers.  The reality is that while few hackers are quite sophisticated, most hackers only have rudimentary skills and basic security measures will prevent your website from being hacked. As an example of what you are dealing with in most cases let’s take a look at someone’s claim on ZONE-H – a website for displaying defaced websites – that they had hacked our website last week. Since that page is supposed to be removed once the claimed defacement is reviewed, here is a screenshot of it:


What you can see with that is that the mirror copy of our website shown from the time of the claimed defacement doesn’t actually show that the website has been hacked. Instead it shows that if you request a page on our website that doesn’t exist you will get a message that it doesn’t exist. Why someone would try to pass that off as defaced/hacked website is unclear to us.

Based on the URL of the supposed defaced page,, what they were trying to exploit was a vulnerability in a WordPress plugin that a) we don’t even use, so there is no chance it could be exploited and b) if we did use it and had the vulnerable outdated version installed they would have needed to try to exploit it from where WordPress is actually installed on our website, which isn’t the root directory of the website as they tried (this could be easily checked on, which again shows the lack of sophistication that usually exists).

Posted in Website Hacked | Leave a comment

Can Fake Reviews For a WordPress Plugin Get More Obvious Than This?

While taking a look into a reported vulnerability in a WordPress plugin recently we noticed a rather glaring example of the use of fake reviews. First and foremost there were almost as many reviews as active installations of the plugin:

Active Installs: 10+, 7 five Star Reviews

Unless the very few people using it really liked the plugin, the number of reviews is way out of line with other plugins (where there usually is one review per one hundred or more active installs).

The other big tip-off was that all the reviews occurred on one day (two days after the plugin was released):


One of those reviews was from someone who was supposed to have used it while running WordPress 1, which seems quite unlikely, to say the least.

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WPScan Incorrectly Identifies Plugin Vulnerabilities as Being Fixed

The WPScan tool is “black box WordPress Security Scanner written in Ruby which attempts to find known security weaknesses within WordPress installations”, which is described as being intended “for security professionals or WordPress administrators to asses the security posture of their WordPress installations.” We find that claim somewhat odd since it scans a WordPress website from the outside of the website, which not only isn’t necessary if you have admin access to the website (which anyone involved with the security of website should have), but is also an inefficient way of doing a security scan when you have that access. While doing some research for another post we identified another problem that makes the tool bad for use by a security professional: their data indicates that plugin vulnerabilities have been fixed as of versions of the plugin that still in fact contain the vulnerabilities. Since this gets to a larger problem we have been seeing, we though it would make sense to take a look at this.

In WPScan’s vulnerability data for a a vulnerability in a plugin named Ajax Search Lite it says that the vulnerability impacted versions at or below 3.1 and that the vulnerability was “fixed in version 3.11”. The first claim is wrong and the second claim was wrong as of the date their data was last updated, March 21. We know this because we help to get the plugin fixed after that.


As part of the process of adding WordPress plugin vulnerabilities to our Plugin Vulnerabilities plugin, we check to make sure the claimed vulnerabilities actually exist (which they sometimes don’t) and we try to determine all of the version that are vulnerable. Knowing what versions are vulnerable is important when trying to determine how a WordPress website was hacked (as we do when cleaning up Hacked WordPress websites), as you can rule out a plugin’s vulnerability if the installed versions is not vulnerable. In adding data for over 225 vulnerabilities to our plugin so far, we have found that while some vulnerabilities have existed in every version of a plugin, many impact less versions, in some cases only one version has been impacted. What has been more surprising in working on the plugin is how often we find that even though a vulnerability has been listed as fixed, it hasn’t been. That was the case with Ajax Search Lite.

When we starting looking into the security advisory for Ajax Search Lite we figured that the vulnerability had probably been fixed in version 3.11 of the plugin based on the changelog entry for that version, “A possible security issue fix”, and the release date. After confirming that vulnerability existed in the prior version, 3.1, we checked to make sure it was fixed in 3.11, but it wasn’t. Looking at the changes between 3.1 and 3.11 we didn’t see anything that looked like the security fix. We then took a look at another plugin from the same developer Related Posts Lite that was reported to have the same issue. In that case the vulnerability had been fixed, so it looked to as if the developer simply forgot to include the fix in Ajax Search Lite. We notified the developer on March 26 of the issue; they then promptly responded and fixed the vulnerability. They still haven’t increased the version number so that anyone who got version 3.11 before that happened is still vulnerable. Because WPScan doesn’t do what we do, with their tool you wouldn’t know that you could still be running an insecure version.

What has made the issue of unfixed vulnerabilities even more surprising to us is that organizations that would think would be careful about this sort of thing, haven’t been. Take for instance another vulnerability we looked at recently. High-Tech Bridge, a security services provider, put out a security advisory for a vulnerability in the Easing Slider plugin. In it they stated that the vulnerability was “Fixed by Vendor” and indicated that the fix occurred in version When we went to check on the vulnerability we found that it still existed in that version. In the changelog for that version it was listed that “Fixed some $_GET input validation security issues.”, which would appear to relate to the security issue identified, but they had not in fact done that to inputs that were the root of this vulnerability. It appears that High Tech Bridge didn’t actually test out their sample exploit in the new version, since it was obvious that it wasn’t fixed if you did that. We alerted the developer to the issue and the locations of the vulnerable code, which lead to the vulnerability actually being fixed in version 2.2.1. Once again if you are relying on WPScan you would be in trouble since they indicate the vulnerability impacted versions at or below and that the vulnerability was “fixed in version”.


While this highlights the problem of relying on WPScan for security purposes, it also points to any area where the security of WordPress plugin could be improved. If WordPress provided a process where a plugin is reviewed after a security vulnerability is supposed to have been fixed then these types of issues could be quickly caught and fixed. As to who would provide the funding for this, we already have a good idea.

Posted in Bad Security, WordPress Plugins | Tagged , | Leave a comment

No One Bothers to Report Security Issue in WordPress Theme Either

For years we have discussed the fact that in many cases with publicly disclosed security vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins, no one bothers to notify the developer or about them (that includes organizations selling WordPress security services like WordFence and WPScan). In many cases if this was done that would be enough to get them fixed. In other cases, when the vulnerability does not get fixed, the plugin will be pulled from the Plugin Directory and that will prevent more websites from adding the vulnerable plugins (alerting people that they are using plugins that have been removed from the directory is something we have been pushing for for years).

We have more than enough time taken up looking into to security issues in plugins, so we rarely look into security issues with themes, but we happened upon one last week that shows the lack of reporting extends to theme issues. Back on February 13 an authenticated arbitrary file upload vulnerability was disclosed in the current version of the Fusion theme, which was available on the Theme Directory. After confirming that the vulnerability existed we reported it to and then within an hour it was pulled from the directory.

What was troubling is that we don’t appear to have been the only people that had taken a look. Here is a screenshot of the graph of downloads from right before the theme was taken down from the Theme Directory:


We are pretty sure that spike in downloads shortly after the disclosure is related to people looking into the vulnerability and yet no one else looking at the issue bothered to report it. That includes the people at WPScan, who again included a vulnerability in their vulnerability database, but didn’t report it.

Posted in Bad Security, WordPress | Tagged | Leave a comment

Is it Time to Upgrade to Zen Cart 1.5.4?

It has now been a couple of months since Zen Cart 1.5.4 was released and we have now handled enough upgrades to the new version to provide our insights on whether it is time to upgrade Zen Cart 1.5.4.

Let’s start with what is new in Zen Cart 1.5.4. The new version doesn’t include any major changes. Instead it includes bug fixes, minor improvements, and security improvements. You can find the full list of changes in the release announcement.

The only issue we have found so far during upgrades is that many addon modules don’t officially support Zen Cart 1.5.4 yet. For some modules they may not need any changes and their maintainer just hasn’t bumped the Zen Cart version supported. Others that modify core Zen Cart files will need to have updated versions of those files included, until they do that you can use those with 1.5.4 if you apply the changes they make to those files to the versions of the file include with 1.5.4. The lack of official support is more of an issue if the modules don’t yet support at least Zen Cart 1.5.3 since that version made some changes that can have significant impact for modules.

With the basics set out, below we provide on advice on whether it is time to upgrade depending on your current situation:

Running Zen 1.3.9, 1.3.8, or older

If you are still running Zen Cart 1.3.9, 1.3.8, or and even older version you are overdue for an upgrade at this point so you should probably go ahead with the upgrade now. While issues with modules and 1.5.4 could cause some issues, you are going to probably run into module issues that will have to be dealt during testing when upgrading from those versions to any version of Zen Cart 1.5.

Need to Be Using a PA-DSS Certified Version of Zen Cart

Prior to Zen Cart 1.5.4 the only version of Zen Cart to be PA-DSS certified was 1.5.0, so you were stuck on that version if you needed PA-DSS certified software for PCI compliance. That wasn’t ideal obviously, but now you can now upgrade and you might need to since the “certification spec expired at the end of 2013” for 1.5.0.

Web Hosting Account Switching to PHP 5.4, 5.5, or 5.6

The number one reason we are hired do Zen Cart upgrades is that version currently being used is not compatible the version of PHP that the web server the website hosted on is being upgraded to. With the support for PHP 5.3 ending back in August web hosts should be moving to at least PHP 5.4 soon (though many web host are only now transitioning off of PHP 5.2 despite support ending in January of 2011). Zen Cart 1.5.4 is the second release to support PHP 5.4, 5.5, and 5.6 so anyone who is not using Zen Cart 1.5.3 and is moving to those versions of PHP should upgrade.

Running 1.5.0, 1.5.1, or 1.5.3

If you don’t need to upgrade for the new versions of PHP, don’t have an urgent need for an of the bug fixes or improvements, and use a lot of modules you may to want hold off until more modules are updated for Zen Cart 1.5.4. Otherwise, it would be a good idea to do upgrade now.

Posted in Zen Cart | Leave a comment

Google’s Bad Answers

Recently we wrote a post on how Google was placing bad instruction for upgrading Zen Cart directly in the search results. We have run across another example of where Google isn’t providing a good answer. If you do a search for “Magento PHP 5.5” currently you get the following answer above the normal search results:

This link says that Magento is compatible with PHP 5.2.13 - 5.3.24, but when you run the PHP script to check server requirements, it says that is okay to run on 5.4 and even 5.5. But I've seen some issues with 5.4 over the internet.Aug 23, 2013

Unlike the Zen Cart upgrade example, the information isn’t wrong, it just out of date. If you following the link referenced in that answer you are taken to the Magento System Requirements page which now lists the latest version of Magento, 1.9.1, as being compatible PHP 5.4 and 5.5 (as we mentioned in a previous post, as of Magento 1.9.1 the bare minimum it will allow being run on is 5.3.0).

The Magento System Requirements page was the first result when we did the search:


So excluding a direct answer would have produced a better result in this case (by comparison the page Google took their answer from was ranked 7th).

Posted in Google, Magento | Leave a comment

WordPress Leaves Very Vulnerable Plugin In Plugin Directory

On March 8 an arbitrary file upload vulnerability, which would allow anyone to upload any kind of files to a website, was disclosed in the Reflex Gallery plugin. This type of vulnerability is probably the most serious vulnerability for a website since, unlike many types of vulnerabilities that rarely get exploited, it is question of when, not if, it will be exploited on websites. This is due to the fact that a hacker can use the vulnerability to upload a .php backdoor script, which will give them remote access to the website without having to interact with the software already running on the website. The only good news in this case it that the plugin is not very popular, the WordPress Plugin Directory lists as having 2,000+ active installs.

When we started to take a look at the vulnerability report to include it in our plugin that notifies of known security vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins we noticed that this plugin had previously had another arbitrary file upload vulnerability that existed in versions 1.0-3.0. The proof of concept for the previous vulnerability looked similar to the new one, both of them targeted the file /admin/scripts/FileUploader/php.php in the plugin. The main difference between them was that second included a couple of URLS parameters in the request, ?Year=2015&Month=03. Our first thought was that new vulnerability might somehow be related those URL parameters, though as we dug in we found what was really going on.

In version 3.0.1 the first vulnerability was fixed by changing the line

$allowedExtensions = array();


$allowedExtensions = array(“jpeg”, “gif”, “png”);

in the file /admin/scripts/FileUploader/php.php.

That restricted what file extensions could be uploaded, so that .php files could not be uploaded. While this provided basic protection, it was less than should have been done. Since the front-end of the plugin’s upload functionality is only accessible admin users the underlying upload function should have also been restricted to admin users. That way if there were some other vulnerability in it only admins would be able to exploit it, which really isn’t much of a problem. There are a couple of other potential issues that come from allowing anyone to upload files. First, you have the chance for denial of service (DOS) attack from someone filling up all of the websites disk space with uploaded files. Second, since only the file extension is limited, it is still possible to upload files with PHP code, which could be combined with a local file inclusion (LFI) vulnerability to exploit a website.

We then looked at what changes were made in the most recent version, 3.1.3, and that showed what happened with the second vulnerability. In the file /admin/scripts/FileUploader/php.php the line

$allowedExtensions = array(“jpeg”, “gif”, “png”);

was changed to

$allowedExtensions = array();

So for some reason the fix that was put in place before was removed, which re-opened the vulnerability. What makes this seems odder is that the changelog for 3.1.3 list only two changes made:

  • Fixed issue of gallery info not updating on Edit Gallery page
  • Additional security fixes

Last Monday, after looking into the vulnerability we attempted to notify the developer of the plugin about the disclosure of the vulnerability and the underlying cause. Were not sure if they got because when we submitted a message on their website’s contact form it didn’t provide any indication that message had been successfully sent. If we can’t reach a developer or they don’t respond our next step with a vulnerability that exist in a plugin that is available in the WordPress Plugin Directory is to report to the people running it. We originally planned to do that on Friday as that would have give the developer four days to deal with it first, but then on Thursday while reviewing our log files to see what WordPress plugin vulnerabilities there had been recent exploit attempts for we saw that there was attempt to exploit this vulnerability. It was done during a series of requests (shown below) that included trying to exploit some rather old vulnerabilities so it is likely that was not an attempt based on the recent disclosure, but the previous one. – – [12/Mar/2015:02:07:37 -0400] “GET /blog/2010/11/19/oscommerce-2-3-includes-fixes-for-security-vulnerabilities-and-security-enhancements//xmlrpc.php HTTP/1.1” 301 567 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:07:38 -0400] “GET /blog/2010/11/19/oscommerce-2-3-includes-fixes-for-security-vulnerabilities-and-security-enhancements/xmlrpc.php HTTP/1.1” 404 6349 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:07:41 -0400] “GET //xmlrpc.php HTTP/1.1” 200 439 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:07:42 -0400] “GET / HTTP/1.1” 200 11041 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:07:52 -0400] “GET //wp-content/themes/vip/includes/uploadify/upload_settings_image.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:07:58 -0400] “GET / HTTP/1.1” 200 11041 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:07 -0400] “GET /wp-content/themes//timthumb.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:10 -0400] “GET / HTTP/1.1” 200 11041 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:19 -0400] “GET /wp-content/themes//thumb.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:23 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/woopra/inc/php-ofc-library/ofc_upload_image.php?name=joss.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:25 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/wp-seo-spy-google/ofc/php-ofc-library/ofc_upload_image.php?name=joss.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:27 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/invit0r/lib/php-ofc-library/ofc_upload_image.php?name=joss.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:29 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/chart/php-ofc-library/ofc_upload_image.php?name=joss.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:31 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/wp-slimstat-ex/lib/ofc/php-ofc-library/ofc_upload_image.php?name=joss.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:33 -0400] “GET /wp-content/themes/cameleon/includes/fileuploader/upload_handler.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:36 -0400] “GET /wp-content/themes/switchblade/framework/_scripts/valums_uploader/php.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:41 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/reflex-gallery/admin/scripts/FileUploader/php.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:45 -0400] “GET /wp-content/themes/elemin/themify/themify-ajax.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:49 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/front-file-manager/upload.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:52 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/complete-gallery-manager/frames/upload-images.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:08:56 -0400] “GET /wp-content/plugins/is-human/engine.php?action=log-reset&type=ih_options();eval(base64_decode(JHM9cGhwX3VuYW1lKCk7CmVjaG8gJzxicj4nLiRzOwoKZWNobyAnPGJyPic7CnBhc3N0aHJ1KGlkKTsK));error HTTP/1.1” 404 5838 “-” “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; en-US; rv:1.9.2) Gecko/20100115 Firefox/3.6” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:09:00 -0400] “POST /wp-content/plugins/radykal-fancy-gallery/admin/image-upload.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5864 “-” “libwww-perl/6.08” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:09:02 -0400] “POST /wp-content/plugins/mm-forms-community/includes/doajaxfileupload.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5864 “-” “libwww-perl/6.08” – – [12/Mar/2015:02:09:05 -0400] “POST /wp-content/plugins/html5avmanager/lib/uploadify/custom.php HTTP/1.1” 404 5864 “-” “libwww-perl/6.08”

At that point we immediately sent an email to the people running the Plugin Directory alerting to the vulnerability and the fact that it was currently being exploited (along with details on three other vulnerabilities). In most cases in the past when we having reported vulnerabilities to them in this way they have quickly responding by taken the plugin down until a fix was released, so that no additional websites would made vulnerable. Unfortunately, as of posting this on Monday morning the plugin has not been updated or pulled from the plugin directory.

Improving The Handling of Plugin Vulnerabilities

This situation highlights a couple of serious problem that come with the current handling vulnerabilities in WordPress plugins, but also points to where improvements can be made.

Making it Easier to Report Vulnerabilities

The current methods for reporting security vulnerabilities are lacking. You can try to contact the developer through their website, but isn’t also easy to find an email address or contact to do that. Some plugins have email addresses they specifically suggest you use to contact them about security issues, but they also can be hard to locate on their websites. You can try contacting the developer through the plugin’s support forum in the Plugin Directory, but not every developer monitors that closely and it is public so that can limit ability to safely disclose information. From what we have seen it appears that many people that are discovering vulnerabilities don’t know that the can also contact the Plugin Directory about the issue, which isn’t too surprising since it isn’t prominent displayed.

One possible solution for this would be to provide a mechanism on the plugin’s page on the Plugin Directory for security vulnerabilities to be reported, which would then send it along to the developer and the people running the Plugin Directory.

Checking on Fixes

What we see fairly often is that when developers attempt to fix publicly disclosed vulnerabilities they either only partially fix it or don’t fix it at all. In other cases the disclosed vulnerability is only part of a wider security issue. Putting a place a process where a review by someone with a better understanding of security is done after the developer thinks they have fixed the vulnerability could go a long way to improving the security of plugins. We already have a good idea of who could provide the financial supports this (in the meantime our checks during the process of adding the vulnerability to our Plugin Vulnerabilities plugin have lead to a number of these situation getting resolved).

In this case if the file uploading had been restricted to admins, then even with the undoing of the file extension restriction the security vulnerability would not have opened back up.

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