False Claim From Bluehost Phishing Email Leads to Bluehost Trying to Sell Unneeded SiteLock Service

On a daily basis we are contacted by people looking for a second opinion after their web host and or their web host’s security partner SiteLock claim that their website contains malware. While a lot of the time there really is some hack of the website that has occurred, though not necessarily involving malware, there are many instances where the claim turns out to be false. There have been many different reasons for that, one of the latest seems like it might be the worst the one yet, since the web hosting partner, Bluehost, tried to sell someone on a $1,200 a year security service from SiteLock based on false information from a phishing email that didn’t even claim there was malware on the website.

What we were told at first about the situation didn’t make sense to us. The website’s owner said they were told by their web host Bluehost that their website was using excessive MySQL resources and that the cause was malware. MySQL is database system and malware and other hacks rarely involve interaction with a database, so we didn’t understand where the belief that malware would be the cause would have come from. Looking at the website made things seem odder. The one possibility we could think of is if a hack added spam content to a website it could cause increased traffic to the website that in turn could increases MySQL resource usage. Not only did we not see any indication of that type of issue, but there was also the fact that the website was built with the Weebly website builder software, which seems unlikely to be hacked in that way or using much in the way of database resources.

After asking if Bluehost provided any more information that might make their conclusion that malware was the cause seem more reasonable, we were forwarded the following email that had started the situation:

Bluehost abuse12@bluehost.com via annika.timeweb.ru

11:16 PM (12 hours ago)

Dear Bluehost customer [redacted]:

It has come to our attention that your site is using an excessive amount of MySQL resources on your BlueHost.Com account. This is causing performance problems on your website as well as for other customers that are on this server. It can cause our servers to crash and cause additional downtime.

Our research shows that server performance degrades when the MySQL usage is over 1,000 tables and/or 3 GB on a single account or 1,000 tables and/or 2 GB on a single database. In order to ensure optimal performance for your account and the others in your shared hosting environment, we request that you reduce the MySQL usage on your account to under these limitsĀ in 14 days.

You must confirm the current copy of our Terms of Service here:
http://my.bluehost.com.687fe34a901a03abed262a62e22f90db.d0013151.atservers.net/domain/[redacted]
How to fix:
http://mysql.bluehost.com.687fe34a901a03abed262a62e22f90db.d0013151.atservers.net/domain/[redacted]

Terms of Service Compliance Department
1958 South 950 East
Provo, UT 84606
Phone line: (888) 401-HOST Option 5 | Fax line: 801-765-1992

The very beginning of that caught our attention first, as it referenced “annika.timeweb.ru”, which seems like it shouldn’t be where an email from Bluehost should be coming from. A Google search on that showed that this email was part of an ongoing phishing campaign against Bluehost customers. Later on in the email the URLs being linked to are intend to look like it is Bluehost by starting “my.bluehost.com” and “mysql.bluehost.com”, but the rest of the domain is “687fe34a901a03abed262a62e22f90db.d0013151.atservers.net”. The server that is hosted from is in Belarus.

Since this was a phishing email there was not anything wrong with the website. So that makes Bluehost’s claim that it was malware and that the SiteLock service should be purchased when they were contacted even odder. The Bluehost support person must not have checked to insure that the issue the customer was contacted about actually existed, despite a phishing campaign going on making false claims along those lines. Even then it doesn’t make sense to say this was malware based on the claimed MySQL resource usage issue. So what explains it?

Well it might have something to do with the fact that Bluehost gets 55% of the revenue from sales of SiteLock services through their partnership or that SiteLock’s owner also run the parent company of Bluehost, the Endurance International Group. Based on what have heard in the past it sounds like when support persons don’t know what is going on they may blame malware for what is going on and point people to SiteLock.

In any case, it is a good reminder to make sure to get a second opinion when you are contacted by SiteLock or their web hosting partners so that you don’t end up spending over a thousand dollars a year on something you don’t need. If you were really hacked you also don’t need to spend anywhere near that amount of money to get the website properly cleaned up (SiteLock doesn’t even properly clean up websites for their high fees).

A Better Alternative to SiteLock
If your web host is pushing you to hire SiteLock to clean up a hacked website, we provide a better alternative, where we actually properly clean up the website if it is truly hacked or if isn't we will help you to get the issue resolved for free.

Before you do anything else though, you should check out our post on what you should know when you get contacted by or about SiteLock.

1 thought on “False Claim From Bluehost Phishing Email Leads to Bluehost Trying to Sell Unneeded SiteLock Service”

  1. Thanks for your post, I just got that email and it didn’t sound legit to me, so before even contacting Bluehost I googled and found your post. I’ll ignore. Thanks again.

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